All The Brilliants

The Skinny on Argyle Pink

The topic of pink diamonds is a riveting (and vast) one. For this reason, my aim is to share a few facets specific to Argyle Pink Diamonds that may not be as well known - and surprise and delight!

Argyle Pink Diamonds from the East Kimberly region in Western Australia have been awarded the @PositiveLuxury #ButterflyMark. This means that each certified diamond is sustainable and ethically sourced - protecting both people and resources.

On the topic of “natural versus lab grown” gemstones, one factor not often considered is a human one. Natural resources found in remote parts of the world are critical to those local economies and communities. Being conscious about what “ingredients” are in jewelry and choosing to support mining communities that follow ethical and sustainable practices (artisanal or industrial for any gemstone) enables meaningful and positive impact in the world.

Beyond being empowered to know what questions to ask when buying any gemstone, many designers are happy to create thoughtfully designed bespoke jewelry with materials that are as beautiful as they are ethically and sustainably sound.


 
The Skinny On Argyle Pink
 

 
Argyle Pink Diamond

This is a sampling of melee representing the wide spectrum of Pink Argyle Diamond hues, courtesy of JFine Diamonds for the purpose of education

PinkArgyleWhatToKnow.jpg

A special thank you to JFine Diamonds for sharing this investment quality Argyle Pink Diamond with me for the purpose of education

The topic of pink diamonds is a riveting (and vast) one. For this reason, my aim is to share a few facets specific to Argyle Pink Diamonds that may not be as well known - and surprise and delight!

Argyle Pink Diamonds from Australia have been awarded the @PositiveLuxury #ButterflyMark. This means that each certified diamond is sustainably and ethically sourced - protecting both people and resources.

In the current dialog of “natural versus lab grown” gemstones, one factor not often considered is a human one. Natural resources found in remote parts of the world are critical to those local economies and communities. Being conscious about what “ingredients” are in jewelry and choosing to support mining communities that follow ethical and sustainable practices (artisanal or industrial for any gemstone) enables meaningful and positive impact in the world.

Beyond being empowered to know what questions to ask when buying any gemstone, many brilliant designers are happy to create thoughtfully designed bespoke jewelry with materials that are as beautiful as they are ethically and sustainably sourced.

As always, I would be delighted to help you make an informed decision on a gemstone or bespoke jewel you will LOVE!

Positive Luxury Butterfly Mark
 

 

JFINE 

As we grow ever more conscious of where our food is grown and how our clothes are made, I believe knowing our jewelry “ingredients” is equally relevant.

Be it diamonds or precious metal, JFine designs jewelry using material from the most ethical mines. Their close partnership with Argyle Pink Diamonds is an example of this. Every stone has a provenance and the chain of custody is known from the time it leaves the mine to the moment it is enjoyed by the person who wears it.

For me, this Argyle Pink Diamond pendant symbolizes the brilliant power of women everywhere who are rising stars in every field and industry that contribute to positive change in the world!

 

Argyle Pink Peony Ring
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KRISTIN HANSON 

Think pink and the dynamic power of women when you see Kristin Hanson’s Argyle Pink Peony Ring on your finger!

Kristin’s aesthetic is beautifully feminine and she shares her deep knowledge of classical European goldsmith techniques and creative philosophies with other women who are emerging designers. Cheers to women supporting women!

 

Argyle Pink Diamond Education

While pink diamonds are very rare, they occur in a wide spectrum of hues from the palest blush through cherry blossom, soft rose to raspberry and a dramatic red. Important color factors regarding value are hue, tone, and saturation. The range is so vast that a proprietary nomenclature is used during the pink diamond grading process.

For example, there are nine color categories, a few of which are: Purplish Pink, Pink, Pink Rosé, Pink Champagne, Blue Violet and Red. Most of these categories include ten variations of light to intense hues. Generally speaking, the more intense colors command a higher market value. Some categories are more rare (Blue Violet and Red) and therefore command an even higher market value.

Argyle Pink Diamond Grading Chart

Courtesy of Argyle Pink Diamonds for the purpose of education

Argyle Pink Diamond Education

First, it is important to note that the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme was established in 2003 - preventing “conflict diamonds” from entering the global marketplace. There is also a movement in the artisanal and industrial gem mining industry to mitigate environmental impact and collaborate with local communities to ensure safer, respectful and fair mining practices. The Argyle Diamond mine in the East Kimberely region of Western Australia is very much committed to protecting people and resources.

Specific to pink diamonds, gem quality material can occur in Africa, Canada, Russia and Australia. Beyond pink, the rarest of the rare colored diamonds are also found in Argyle: cornflower blue, potent violet and sumptuous red.

90 Percent of Pink Diamonds are from the Argyle mine
Argyle Pink Diamond Education

Most gem quality diamonds are not treated. For the small percentage that are, it would be to improve clarity or alter color. Such enhancements would be noted on a certificate from a credentialed lab.

On the topic of treatment of any kind with any gemstone, knowledge is power because it always impacts value.

Argyle Pink Diamond Education

The Mohs scale of hardness is important to consider when choosing a particular stone for a particular kind of wear. Mohs scale is the degree of mineral “hardness”, measured by the resistance which a smooth surface offers to abrasion: 1 (soft) to 10 (hard). For example, an 8 will scratch a gemstone that is a 7 or below. Simply put, the softer the stone, the more careful you need to be about wearing that stone in jewelry that may be exposed to more wear.

Diamond is at the top of the scale at 10. Be aware that because they are the hardest of stones, diamonds can scratch and damage softer stones that they may come in contact with. It is important that diamond jewelry be stored separately (for example in its own box or pouch) to ensure it will encounter less contact with softer stones.

Diamond is a 10 on the Mohs scale
Argyle Pink Diamond Education

A few jewelry care basics can keep your pieces looking their best, avoid damage and loss of gemstones.

WEAR: When dressing for day or night, jewelry should be the last thing on and the first thing off. Contact with chemicals such as fragrance, hairspray, nail polish remover, household cleaners and chlorine can harm jewelry. Remove jewelry when swimming, cleaning, gardening or playing sports, as active wear can damage or loosen settings - resulting in the loss of stones.

CHECK SETTINGS AND STONES: Inspect jewelry before wearing it to check if stone is chipped, loose or rattles in settings.

CLEANING: All precious metals, gemstones and pearls should be cleaned regularly, but require different care. For example, ultrasonic cleaners can crack opals, shatter pearls or diminish their appearance. For gemstones on the Mohs scale at 7 or above, a simple cleaning solution is warm water with mild soap and soft toothbrush. For those at 6 or below, replace the toothbrush with a soft cloth. Be sure the jewel is thoroughly rinsed and dry prior to storage. A soft polishing cloth will keep any precious metal looking its best. 

STORAGE: Keep jewelry individually stored in a pouch or box to avoid scratches and abrasions from other gemstones and metal, as well as general tangles and dents.

INSURANCE: For any jewelry of significant value, be sure to have it appraised, file any provenance and gemstone certifications in a secure place and be sure to have it insured.