All The Brilliants

The Skinny on Amethyst

This luscious purple gemstone was once revered as a luxurious rival of ruby and emerald. In the 19th century, amethyst suddenly became less so when generous deposits of amethyst were discovered in Brazil. Yet it remains unquestionably beautiful! 

Our ancestors were rather “creative” with the attributes ascribed to amethyst, including being a blemish remover - just add moisture! Ancient Greeks believed wearing amethyst or drinking out of an amethyst cup would prevent intoxication. Amethystos means “not drunk” in Ancient Greek. A few myths cooked up during the Renaissance involved a maiden called Amethyst who was turned into a clear stone by the goddess Diana to escape dubious intentions of Bacchus, who then spilled wine on this pure stone - turning it purple. Ancient Egyptians wore amethyst amulets to protect against harm and it was also viewed as an antidote to the effects of wine.

Whatever it may symbolize for you today, we've outlined points to help you understand value and what to ask to make an informed decision on the amethyst you will LOVE!

 
All The Brilliants
 

 
The Skinny on Amethyst
 

 
Amethyst Things To Know

This natural amethyst is courtesy of Wild & Petsch for the purpose of education - 45.36 carats

Amethyst Byzantine Ring from Les Enluminures - 500 AD

This Byzantine ring from Les Enluminures is a divinely perched cabochon cut amethyst set in high carat gold. It is dated to 500 AD - the ascent of the empire.

The Byzantines were also rather attached to the Ancient Greek idea that amethyst would protect the wearer from insobriety!

This luscious purple gemstone was once revered as a luxurious rival of ruby and emerald. In the 19th century, amethyst suddenly became less so when generous deposits of amethyst were discovered in Brazil. Yet it remains unquestionably beautiful! 

Our ancestors were rather “creative” with the attributes ascribed to amethyst, including being a blemish remover - just add moisture! Ancient Greeks believed wearing amethyst or drinking out of an amethyst cup would prevent intoxication. Amethystos means “not drunk” in Ancient Greek. A few myths cooked up during the Renaissance involved a maiden called Amethyst who was turned into a clear stone by the goddess Diana to escape dubious intentions of Bacchus, who then spilled wine on this pure stone - turning it purple. Ancient Egyptians wore amethyst amulets to protect against harm and it was also viewed as an antidote to the effects of wine.

Whatever it may symbolize for you today, we've outlined points to help you understand value and what to ask to make an informed decision on the amethyst you will LOVE!

 

 

DUBINI JEWELLERY 

These ancient coins were struck during a time when amethyst was believed to prevent drunkenness while drinking wine - so long as it was worn or in one’s mouth! Yes, you read that correctly.

In @Dubini_Official’s signature synthesis of pairing the ancient with the modern, Benedetta has beautifully blended amethyst discs with authentic coins: an Ariarathes IX Eusebes Philopator (101-87 B.C.) and a Venetian gold ducat coin (LXII Doge 1382-1400).

The zoning of the varied purple hues in the amethyst material enhances the wonderful spell of wearing the same objects our ancient ancestors touched!

 

Jolly Bijou Amethyst Sundial Earrings
 

JOLLY BIJOU 

As amethyst has been attributed so many varied properties over time, it is fitting to share a jewel that is inspired by a device that tells the time!

@Jolly_Bijou’s graphic interpretation of the Sundial has amethysts arranged around a dial, mimicking hour lines with a barre wrapped around to echo the gnomon (the element that casts a shadow).

Caroline’s work expresses a playful spontaneity, evocative of the art deco movement with a splash of sensuality.

 


Amethyst Education The Ideal

That time when iron met quartz… amethyst happened!

While the most prized amethysts exhibit an intense reddish purple (known as “raspberry”), colors can range from pale lilac to cool bluish purple to dark purple hues. Amethysts can be translucent to transparent and commonly exhibit “zoning”, which is angular stripes of dark and light color. Qualities like zoning, inclusions, brownish bronze tints, or colors that are too dark may not be what the “market” dictates as the most valuable, but they can be uniquely beautiful for these characteristics!

Amethyst Education Origin

Amethyst is common and found on every continent. Since the 19th century, the largest supply is from Brazil, followed by Zambia. It is mined throughout South America, Africa, North America, Russia and beyond.

ZAMBIA - desirable saturated purple, sometimes with blue or red flashes

BRAZIL - the world’s largest producer of pale lilac to mid-purple tones

RUSSIA - desirable deep purple hues

Amethyst Education Treatment

Heat treatment of amethyst material can eliminate less desirable brownish inclusions or lighten the color of dark stones.

On the topic of treatment of any kind with any gemstone, knowledge is power because it always impacts value.

Amethyst Education Mohs Scale

The Mohs scale of hardness is important to consider when choosing a particular stone for a particular kind of wear. Mohs scale is the degree of mineral “hardness”, measured by the resistance which a smooth surface offers to abrasion: 1 (soft) to 10 (hard). For example, a 9 will scratch a gemstone that is an 8 or below. Simply put, the softer the stone, the more careful you need to be about wearing that stone in jewelry that may be exposed to more wear, such as a ring.

Amethyst is quartz, which is 7 on the Mohs scale. “7” is noteworthy because common dust can contain minute particles of quartz. If present, any gemstone below 7 would be scratched when cleaning, so be sure to wash under warm water prior to wiping off dust! 

Amethyst Education Wear and Care

A few jewelry care basics can keep your pieces looking their best, avoid damage and loss of gemstones.

WEAR: When dressing for day or night, jewelry should be the last thing on and the first thing off. Contact with chemicals such as fragrance, hairspray, nail polish remover, household cleaners and chlorine can harm jewelry. Remove jewelry when swimming, cleaning, gardening or playing sports, as active wear can damage or loosen settings - resulting in the loss of stones.

CHECK SETTINGS AND STONES: Inspect jewelry before wearing it to check if stone is chipped, loose or rattles in settings.

CLEANING: All precious metals, gemstones and pearls should be cleaned regularly, but require different care. For example, ultrasonic cleaners can shatter pearls or diminish the appearance of emeralds. For gemstones on the Mohs scale at 7 or above, a simple cleaning solution is warm water with mild soap and soft toothbrush. For those at 6 or below, replace the toothbrush with a soft cloth. Be sure the jewel is thoroughly rinsed and dry prior to storage. A soft polishing cloth will keep any precious metal looking its best. 

STORAGE: Keep jewelry individually stored in a pouch or box to avoid dents, scratching and tangles. Chemicals, humidity and excessive hot/cold conditions can tarnish some metals (apart from high karat gold) and damage gemstones and pearls. 

INSURANCE: For any jewelry of significant value, be sure to have it appraised, file any provenance and gemstone certifications in a secure place and be sure to have it insured.